04 Aug 2017
Image credit: www.freshoffthegrid.com

Food and Fire: Campfire Recipes – Pan Pizza

You can just about cook anything on a campfire and one of our AH favourites is the Pan Pizza! 🙂

There are a few essential items that you do need to be able to cook with fire well, and a few that are ‘nice to haves’. So I thought we would start with the absolute basic must have and work our way through some recipes to use the essential campfire kit…

The solid steel frying pan.  Is an absolute outdoor fire cooking essential. Double handled pots are handy too but a fry pan is an essential in my book. You can buy one at Greenman Bushcraft.

Pan Pizza

Yummy, crunchy bottom to this pizza if you get it right, burnt to a crisp if you get it wrong 🙂

Make sure that your fire is cooling when you cook this and the top cheese will be molten, not that golden brown, but its just as delicious!

Image credit: www.freshoffthegrid.com

PIZZA INGREDIENTS

Toppings of your choice… we recommend that you use fresh mozzarella balls, fresh basil and tomato sauce, with a sprinkling of Cheddar or Red Leicester cheese.  And for those blue cheese fiends then gorgonzola is amazing on this pizza, as it melts into the crust!

This is also a great pudding pizza – add some fresh berries mixed with mascarpone and heat through, until the berries are warm and the mascarpone has melted a bit into the dough crust. Or mix figs with syrup with mascarpone and, again this is a simply marvelous pudding pizza

PIZZA DOUGH INGREDIENTS

500g white bread flour (preferably 00 flour, but strong white break flour is OK too)
100g semolina flour (finely ground)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1x 7g yeast sachet
½ teaspoon golden caster sugar
3 tablespoons of olive oil (and a little extra for cooking the pizza in the skillet/frying pan with)

METHOD

  1. Sieve the flour/s and salt on to a clean work surface and make a well in the middle.
  2. In a jug, mix the yeast, sugar and oil into 650ml of lukewarm water and leave for a few minutes, then pour into the well.
  3. Using a fork, bring the flour in gradually from the sides and swirl it into the liquid. Keep mixing, drawing larger amounts of flour in, and when it all starts to come together, work the rest of the flour in with your clean, flour-dusted hands. Knead until you have a smooth, springy dough.
  4. Place the ball of dough in a large flour-dusted bowl and flour the top of it. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and place in a warm room for about an hour until the dough has doubled in size.
  5. Now remove the dough to a flour-dusted surface and knead it around a bit to push the air out with your hands – this is called knocking back the dough. You can either use it immediately, or keep it, wrapped in clingfilm, in the fridge (or freezer) until required.
  6. If using straight away, divide the dough up into as many little balls as you want to make pizzas – this amount of dough is enough to make about four medium pizzas, or if you have a big skillet/frying pan, about two.
  7. Timing-wise, it’s a good idea to roll the pizzas out about 15 to 20 minutes before you want to cook them. Don’t roll them out and leave them hanging around for a few hours, though – if you are working in advance like this it’s better to leave your dough, covered with clingfilm, in the fridge. However, if you want to get them rolled out so there’s one less thing to do when your guests arrive, simply roll the dough out into rough circles, about 0.5cm thick, and place them on slightly larger pieces of olive-oil-rubbed and flour-dusted tin foil. You can then stack the pizzas, cover them with clingfilm, and pop them into the fridge.
  8. Once you’ve got your pizza dough sorted, then heat up the skillet/frying pan with some olive oil in it, over a cooling fire.
  9. Cook one side of the pizza until it is golden brown, and crisp – keep checking!  You really need to keep an eye on this, as there are usually hot spots in the fire that overcook certain bits, so keep moving the pan around so that it cooks evening.
  10. Turnover and repeat.

Add your toppings and then cover with tin foil to cook through again (or a pan lid, to make a mini oven) until the cheese on top has melted and your veg or other toppings are as soft as you would like them and cooked through.

For a step by step picture guide to making campfire pizzas go here

We’ll be back with more tasty campfire cooking recipes soon! See our other easy campfire recipes here!

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21 Jul 2017
Campfire Recipes | Pheasant with Wild Garlic

Food and Fire: Campfire Recipes – Pheasant Breasts with Wild Garlic Leaves

Wild Garlic is a foragers delight and can be used for a whole host of recipes. It is great for campfire cooking and we will share with you our favourite AH Wild Garlic Pesto recipe another time! 🙂

Do make sure you pick the right thing – Wild Garlic – and not any other wild flower (like Lilly of the Valley for example) which may be poisonous.

Campfire Recipes | Pheasant with Wild Garlic

Pheasant Breasts with Wild Garlic Leaves

Serves 4

This has got to be one of those angelic food combinations…quick, easy; food from the Gods.

I know not everyone likes pheasant, but please try this, and if you simply can’t face pheasant breasts, or can’t get hold of them then mini-chicken fillets work almost as well.

INGREDIENTS

4 x decent sized pheasant breasts or 8 mini-chicken fillets
A really good sized bunch of wild garlic leaves, foraged hopefully as I’m not sure you can buy these at any supermarket yet!  Best picked in April and May, fresh, and often found near Bluebell woodland at the same time the bluebells are flowering.

METHOD

  1. Take your pheasant breasts of your whole pheasants and set aside the rest of the pheasant to make stock (recipe follows with Dutch Oven instructions!).
  2. Once you have your pheasant breasts off the bone, simply take your frying pan over a medium hot fire (coals still red, with a small amount of grey ash showing, no big flames left) and heat a really generous knob of butter in the frying pan (about 100g for 4 breasts) until it is almost browning.
  3. Pop your pheasant breasts into the pan, and cook until just done and golden brown (they will be moist and amazing if done right). This is approx. 10-12 minutes, depending on the size of the breasts, heat of the pan etc.
  4. Mini-chicken fillets will take a bit less time so keep an eye on these and make sure they don’t become dry and yuck!
  5. Take these out of the pan when done, and set aside into another dish in the edge embers of the fire to stay warm, or stacked to the side of the frying pan, on the edge of the heat.
  6. Take your wild garlic leaves (I like the flowers too) and pop these in to cook in the remaining butter and let them just wilt.
  7. Serve up your Pheasant breasts with the wilted Wild Garlic, (making sure to scrape every last bit of buttery juice out of the pan) and a good hunk of crusty bread to mop up the juices. (PS – Wood Fired Rolls recipe to follow another time!)

Watch this space for further campfire essentials and recipes to match!

Campfire Recipes | Pheasant with Wild Garlic

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09 Jun 2017

Food and Fire: Campfire Recipes – Classic Camp Curry

Here at AH, we are lucky enough to have a Scout built fire pit, rough and ready and very basic, but just perfect for trying out this recipe.

But first things first – essential campfire cooking kit!

You will need a Dutch Oven – a multi-purpose campfire cooking item that can be used as a frying pan if you’ve not got a solid steel frying pan (but it doesn’t work quite so well, for obvious reasons!). If you haven’t got a Dutch Oven, I actually use my AGA and Le Crueset pots on the campfire – so far so good! – but I can’t promise they were meant for that purpose, or yours will survive the experience, so please don’t blame me if you try. 🙂

You can buy a suitable Dutch Oven online at Greenman Bushcraft.

Campfire Recipes | Camp Curry | Dutch Oven
Typical Dutch Oven for stews or curry

This can be used with a tripod to hold the oven on, but you can just pop the oven straight onto your flattened down fire, or make sure you have a bit of chicken wire and 8 bricks – so that you can make a raised grid to make a flat cooking surface in the fire.

Classic Camp Curry

Serves 4-6

Delicious, simple curry that is totally versatile and will take just about any odds and ends of vegetables you have in the fridge to finish up as well!

This is not for the faint hearted as it has a good heat to it, but add extra coconut milk to taste, and serve with a delicious fruit raita to cool things down a bit, or a Mango Lassi.

Sometimes its good to warm up a bit when out camping in the winter.

INGREDIENTS

900g diced Lamb, Beef or Pork
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 large red onion, finely sliced (reserve a few slivers for the garnish)
2 inch piece of ginger, grated
4 crushed garlic cloves
12 curry leaves
3 tbsp extra hot curry paste or 4 tbsp hot curry powder
1 tbsp chilli powder
1 tsp five spice
1 tsp ground turmeric
175ml thick coconut milk (or if you can’t get thick milk then coconut cream is ok)
1 tsp salt

METHOD

  1. Heat the oil in the dutch oven, and fry the onion, ginger, garlic and half the curry leaves until the onion is soft.  Add the curry paste or power, chilli and 5 spice powder, turmeric and salt.
  2. Add the meat and stir well to seal in the juice and brown the meat all over, keep stirring until the oil separates.  Pop the lid on and cover and cook for about 20 mins.
  3. Add the coconut milk and the rest of the curry leaves, and recover the pan.  Cook for a further  30 mins approx., or until the meat is cooked (this will depend on the type of meat you have used).  Towards the end of cooking take the lid off the oven and reduce the excess sauce.
  4. Serve with Flat Bread and Fruit Raita or Mango or Fruit Lassi.

Watch this space for further campfire essentials and recipes to match!

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